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New Dentures

New Dentures
My new dentures

Adjusting to your new dentures

If you’ve just started wearing dentures, you are likely to feel a little self-conscious about the way they look and way you sound when you speak. This can be difficult to deal with, but don’t worry, it will be worth it. With a little time wearing dentures will start to feel natural and you will be able to eat, speak and smile with confidence once more. The muscles in your tongue, cheeks and lips will need to become adjusted to holding your dentures in place, and after a while, this will become second nature. With a little patience and plenty of practice, you’ll get there in the end.

What you can expect in the first few days

You will find that you will salivate more than before, this is normal as your mouth gets used to the foreign object in your mouth, but after a while, salivation with decrease. You may also suffer from a little soreness in the beginning as your gum tissue becomes accustomed to the denture. If your gums are still healing from tooth extraction, you can expect them to feel a bit sensitive. To help with the soreness, you can rinse your mouth out with warm salt water during the first 14 days. However, if any soreness or pain persists then, you should consult your dentist or dental technician at your next checkup.

New False teeth

Eating and speaking

The difficulty with speech can dent the confidence of new denture wearers, but it will feel more natural with time, and you will be able to form words with ease once more. Try practising any troublesome words when you’re alone. You can read and sing aloud to get as much practice as possible.

When it comes to eating, start with soft foods and cut your food into small pieces. After a while, you can gradually move on to harder and more difficult to chew foods to keep up a balanced and healthy diet. Practise chewing on both sides of your denture to keep it stable.

Further Advice & Answers

It’s vital to maintain dentures properly to prolong the life of the denture, ensure a clean and bright smile and to promote good oral health. It is recommended that you brush, rinse and soak your dentures daily. For details on how to care for your dentures, read our Denture Care Advice.

It should take around 30 days to grow fully accustomed to your new dentures. It will take patience and practise to get used to the strange way they feel in your mouth and to chew and speak naturally again. Ensure you keep any dental appointments so your dentist can check how you are adjusting and so you can share any concerns you may have.

Gagging is caused when the part of the denture touches the back of your mouth. In the beginning, your dentures may slip around a little as your mouth gets used to holding them in place, and this could be why you are gagging. Or it could be because your gums are still inflamed from tooth extraction and are pushing the denture further into the back of your mouth. So it is likely that any gagging will cease, but if it doesn’t, it may be that you have a particularly sensitive gag reflex and require an adjustment to your dentures or dental implants.
You may notice that your new dentures feel loose in the first few days. This is because the muscles in your tongue, cheeks and lips will need to adapt to hold your dentures in place. However, if your dentures continue to feel loose, they may need an adjustment.

You may suffer from a little soreness or pain in the beginning as your gum tissue becomes accustomed to the denture. Also, if your gums are still healing from tooth extraction, you can expect them to be a bit sensitive, to begin with. According to the Oral Health Foundation, healing after tooth extraction can take several months. To help with the soreness, you can rinse your mouth out with warm salt water during the first 14 days. But, if any soreness or pain persists then, you should consult your dentist or dental technician at your next checkup.

 

Repair Cost
People in or around London, Get Dentures Repaired Starting at £85

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